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Workplace Injuries Archives

Workplace safety is not necessarily on the mind of young workers

Many employers in British Columbia look to to employ young, inexperienced workers who are eager to prove themselves and keen to learn. However, not all business owners realize that young workers may also be distracted, with many non-work-related matters on their minds. As young workers acclimatize to the workplace, employers may find that they must spend more time training young workers on workplace safety than they would with older, more seasoned workers.

Can violence-related workplace injury in health care be limited?

In June this year, a standing committee of the House of Commons tabled a report with several recommendations to address violence aimed at health care workers in British Columbia and across Canada. For decades, violence-related workplace injury victims had to handle it as par for the course, and the aim is to put a stop to that mindset. A report by the Canadian Federation of Nurses Union indicates that over 60% of nurses say they have been victims of harassment, assault and abuse while on duty.

Who pays for a casual worker's workplace injury?

While workers' compensation obligations are par for the course for British Columbia businesses with permanent employees, they also give rise to many questions for those who hire contractors or subcontractors. Who will be liable if a subcontractor suffers a workplace injury? Business owners can avoid having to pay additional insurance premiums by obtaining a clearance letter from WorkSafeBC that states whether the contractor is registered and paying workers' compensation premiums itself.

Workplace injury in construction zones rise in spring and summer

According to WorkSafeBC, activities on road construction sites in British Columbia increase significantly during the spring and summer months. This is also the time that puts road construction workers at increased workplace injury risks. Along with the typical dangers posed by the equipment these workers use in the course of their work, they are further threatened by traffic moving through the work zone.

Workplace injury: Workers can refuse to work in unsafe conditions

Employers in British Columbia are responsible for the protection of the health and safety of their employees. Workers must be informed of the known hazards that pose workplace injury risks, and they should be given safety training to learn how to mitigate those hazards. Workers who are tasked with jobs in unsafe conditions have the right to refuse to do the work.

Focus on craft brewery workplace injury risks

Employers in British Columbia must protect the health and safety of their workers. WorkSafeBC expects employers in all industries to mitigate known safety hazards to prevent on-the-job accidents. The craft brewery industry is growing rapidly, and safety authorities say the workplace injury risks have increased at a similar pace.

Bill to protect nurses from violence-related workplace injury

All employers in British Columbia have various obligations and duties toward employees. The Workers' Compensation Act requires employers to protect the health and safety of employees. An employer who fails to comply with the required standards could be held accountable if an employee should suffer a preventable workplace injury. However, some believe that health care workers in particular need more protection against workplace violence.

Carcinogens are as threatening as any other workplace injury

Workers in all industries in British Columbia are exposed to hazards in the workplace. While any workplace injury that involves fractured bones or open wounds is easy to recognize as being work-related, some occupational illnesses might be questioned. However, an endless list of carcinogens and radiation sources exist in various industries, and employers must protect employees against them.

Needles and sharp objects pose serious workplace injury hazards

The hazards posed by puncture wounds caused by needlesticks and other sharp objects are prevalent in the health care industry. However, the threat of this type of workplace injury can also be found in Vancouver facilities where workers deal with solid waste and recovery of recycling material. These injuries often involve inadvertent skin punctures during the disposal or disassembly of hypodermic needles.

Workplace injury: Authorities concerned about asbestos exposure

The continued dangers posed by asbestos may alarm British Columbia residents, homeowners and workers. Since 2000, the numbers of work-related fatalities from diseases caused by asbestos have exceeded the numbers of any other type of workplace injury in the province. In a December 2018 report entitled Keeping Workers, the Public and the Environment Safe from Asbestos, the BC government reported that asbestos-related occupational diseases continue to pose a serious threat to the health of workers, and compiled a number of recommendations to reduce the impact of asbestos.

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